How Do I Get an Engineering Degree?

Most employers want engineers to have a B.S. in a field of engineering. You can start your course of study at Foothill College before transferring to a four-year university or college where you'll earn your bachelor’s degree in engineering.

Getting Started

If you are interested in pursuing a bachelor’s in engineering, start by meeting with a counselor to design an educational plan based on the schools and majors that you are interested in attending.

FOLLOW THESE STEPS!

  1. Schedule an appointment with a counselor
  2. Check assist.org for current articulation (transfer) agreements between the California Community Colleges and the University of California (UC) schools and the California State University (CSU) schools. You'll want to research which courses will be automatically considered equivalent.
  3. Be prepared to discuss your pathway plans with a counselor. See EXAMPLE Pathway below for a better understanding.

EXAMPLE Pathway for Studying Engineering

Note: There are many different engineering four-year degree plans into which students from Foothill College could transfer. When you meet with a counselor, you'll want to keep the following in mind.

  • Start course sequences (MATH, CHEM, or PHYS) as soon as possible
  • Wait to take GE requirements, unless specified by the university
  • Engineering courses that do not have prerequisites: Engr 10, Engr 49, Engr 6
  • Engineering courses that prepare you for an internship: Engr 6
  • Introductory engineering courses: Engr 10, Engr 49

Year One

Fall 1 (15 – 16 units)
Winter 1 (16 – 20 units)
Spring 1 (16 – 21 units)
Math 1A
Chem 1A
Engr 10
Engr 49*
Math 1B
Chem 1B
Phys 4A
Engr 6*
Math 1C
Chem 1C*
Phys 4B
Engr 11
*Courses in grey with asterisks are optional for many of the four-year college transfer plans.

Year Two

Fall 2 (19 – 21 units)
Winter 2 (15 – 20 units)
Spring 2 (16 – 21 units)
Math 1D
Phys 4C
Engr 35
Engr 37
Engr 37L*
Math 2A
Engr 45
Engr 46*
GE course
Math 2B
Phys 4D*
Engr 47
GE course
*Courses in grey with asterisks are optional for many of the four-year college transfer plans.

 

Top of page